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Flag And Pole Pattern

By News Canvass | Jun 06, 2023

Flag and pole pattern

  • When price movement trades inside a range for long enough, it creates a pattern on a chart that resembles a flag.
  • For the flags to be properly positioned on a chart, an upswing in price activity must have preceded them. A prior upswing is required to form the pole of the bullish flag pattern, which is then followed by a price range to form the flag. The most common bullish flag pattern is a flag range that is slightly declining, with lower highs and lower lows.
  • When a downturn is followed by a slightly climbing trading range, it forms an inverted flag and pole pattern, which is known as a bearish flag pattern. In this article, we’ll simply talk about the more common bull flag design.

What is flag and pole pattern in technical analysis?

  • A flag and pole is a chart pattern that develops in the context of technical analysis when there is a sudden move in either direction, the price consolidates in a range following the sharp move, and the price then continues to move in the same direction after it breaks out of the range. Its visual resemblance to a flag and a pole led to its naming. The flag and pole pattern is employed to determine if a prior trend may continue.
  • The price settles into a range after a strong move in either way, and if it breaks out of the range in the same direction as the prior trend, the price gain might be swift, making the trade profitable.

How is the flag and pole pattern formed?

  • Flags are pockets of price consolidation that are closely spaced and indicate a counter-trend move that comes immediately after a significant price directional shift.
  • Typically, the design comprises of anything from five to twenty candlesticks. Bullish flag and pole flag patterns have an upward tendency, whereas bearish flag and pole flag patterns have a downward trend. The flag’s bottom shouldn’t protrude more than the flagpole before it at its halfway.

What are the key characteristics of flag and pole pattern?

Specifications of the Flag and Pole Pattern

There are four primary qualities of flag patterns:

  1. The prior trend: The abrupt movement in either direction that occurs before the price enters a consolidation phase is known as the preceding trend. This serves as the flag and pole formation’s pole.
  2. The consolidation channel, which serves as the flag of the flag and pole pattern, is generated following the initial abrupt directional shift.
  3. The volume pattern shows an initial increase in volume, followed by a minor decrease, and then, after the price has left the consolidation range, a strong increase in volume once more.
  4. A breakout: The final element of the flag and pole design is the breakout. A goal the length of the pole can be anticipated after the price breaks through the consolidation zone in the direction of the prior trend.

What are the different types of flag and pole pattern?

1. An aggressive flag and pole pattern

  • The price increases during the initial trend move in this illustration of a bullish flag pattern before falling into the consolidation region.
  • When the flag breaks out, we may place the transaction. Your aim should be the length of the flagpole, and your stop loss can be placed at the bottom of the flag.
  • Although a big volume rise may not always accompany the breakthrough, analysts and traders prefer to see one since it suggests that new waves of enthusiastic investors and other traders have entered the stock.

2. Polar bear flag and pattern

  • The price falls during the initial trend move in this illustration of a bearish flag and pole pattern before rising through the consolidation region.
  • When the flag breaks out, we may place the transaction. Your aim should be the length of the flagpole, and your stop loss can be placed at the top of the flag.
  • The volume does not usually decrease during the consolidation phase of a bearish flag pattern. This is due to the fact that investor fear and worry over declining prices frequently underlie negative, downward-trending price movements. The more prices decline, the more pressure there is on surviving investors to act.

How can traders use the flag and pole pattern to make trading decisions?

By only defining three crucial points—entry, stop loss, and profit target—a trader may create a method for trading such patterns using the dynamics of the flag pattern.

  • Entry: It is advisable to wait for the initial breakout to avoid getting a misleading signal, even though flags tend to point to a continuation of the present trend. The day after the price has broken through and closed above the upper parallel trend line is often when traders anticipate entering a flag (for long positions). The day after the price has closed below (short position) the lower parallel trend line in a bearish pattern.
  • Stop Loss: Traders often anticipate using the flag pattern’s opposing side as a stop-loss position. A price level below Rs 51 per share would be a suitable spot to set the stop-loss order for a long position, for instance, if the upper trend line of the pattern is at Rs 55 per share and the lower trend line of the pattern is at Rs 51 per share.
  • Profit objective: Conservative traders could choose to utilize the price differential between the parallel trend lines of the flag pattern to create a profit objective. The trader would set a profit objective of Rs 59 if there is a differential of Rs 4 and the breakout entry point is Rs 55. Setting a profit objective by measuring the distance between the pattern’s top and the flagpole’s base would be a more upbeat strategy.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): -

The flag and pole pattern is a bullish continuation pattern in technical analysis. It resembles a flag on a pole and indicates a temporary pause or consolidation within an uptrend before the price continues its upward movement.

The flag and pole pattern is formed by a sharp upward price move (the pole) followed by a period of consolidation or sideways price movement (the flag). The flag is typically characterized by parallel trendlines that slope in the opposite direction of the pole.

Key characteristics of the flag and pole pattern include a strong and steep price advance (pole), a flag pattern that represents a pause or consolidation, declining trading volume during the flag formation, and an expectation for the continuation of the prior uptrend after the pattern completes.

There are different types of flag and pole patterns, such as a bullish flag (bull flag) and a bearish flag (bear flag). The bullish flag occurs within an uptrend and signals a potential continuation of the upward move. The bearish flag appears within a downtrend and suggests a possible continuation of the downward move.

Traders can use the flag and pole pattern to make trading decisions by looking for a potential breakout or continuation of the prior trend. They may enter long positions when the price breaks above the upper trendline of a bull flag or short positions when the price breaks below the lower trendline of a bear flag. Proper risk management and confirmation from other indicators are essential for trading decisions.

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